Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse 1913: Seeds Of Conflict for showing the
true roots of the Jewish Nationalism and Arab Nationalism Conflict.

1913: Seeds Of Conflict
Early Encounters Between Jewish and Arab Nationalism

1913: Seeds Of Conflict (2015) - 60 minutes
1913: Seeds Of Conflict at Amazon.com

1913: Seeds of Conflict examines a critical yet overlooked moment of transformation in Palestine, long before the Balfour Declaration and British Mandate period usually considered the matchstick for today's ongoing struggles. It was a time when identities were fluid and few Arabs or Jews could imagine the conflict that would engulf the region for the next century.

1913 explores the crumbling of Ottoman rule and rise of Jewish and Palestinian nationalism through the words of those who helped shape history: Albert Antebi, a Sephardic Jew known as the Jewish 'pasha'; Ruhi al-Khalidi, the scion of a Palestine family and Jerusalem's elected representative to the Ottoman Parliament; Khalil Sakakini, a Christian schoolmaster and voice for Palestinian cultural autonomy; and Arthur Ruppin, a German Zionist who opens the Palestine Office to strategize the shape of a Jewish homeland to come.

5-20-16 Sykes-Picot: The map that made the Mideast
Sykes-Picot: The map that made the Mideast
“Exactly a century ago, an Englishman and a Frenchman unrolled a map of the Middle East and drew an improbably straight line across the desert,” said David Blair in The Daily Telegraph (U.K.). The two diplomats, Sir Mark Sykes and François Georges-Picot, were deciding how to split up the Ottoman Empire during World War I into British and French spheres of influence. With all the breezy arrogance of a colonial official, Sykes declared, “I should like to draw a line from the E in Acre to the last K in Kirkuk.” Ignoring the region’s “explosive ethnic and religious divides,” he did just that, carving out the entirely artificial nations of Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon. A century later, “the curse of Sykes-Picot still haunts the Middle East,” said Robin Wright in The New Yorker. Iraq and Syria are fractured by bitter conflicts among Sunnis, Shiites, and other sects. The Kurds, split into four countries, are still fighting for autonomy. “Even the Islamic State seeks to undo the old borders,” proudly claiming that it’s hammering “the last nail in the coffin of the Sykes-Picot conspiracy.”

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1913: Seeds Of Conflict
Early Encounters Between Jewish and Arab Nationalism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse 1913: Seeds Of Conflict for showing the
true roots of the Jewish Nationalism and Arab Nationalism Conflict.