Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse A Generation Apart for showing how
children's parents are forever affected by their Holocaust experiences.

A Generation Apart
It takes years to heal some wounds.
Others we keep for generations.

A Generation Apart (2008) - 56 minutes
A Generation Apart at Amazon.com

A documentary film portraying the impact of the Holocaust on families of concentration camp survivors, A Generation Apart brings to the screen a new and dramatic dimension of Hitler's attempted destruction of the Jewish people. Now that the children of the survivors are grown, it has become painfully clear that their parents' wartime horrors have formed a very real emotional cornerstone in their families' relationships. A Generation Apart captures these family relationships with incredibly candid - and sometimes explosive - confrontations between survivors and their children in a way that illuminates the nature of problems between parents and children in general.

In loving memory of our mother, Esther Fisher

6-16-18 Preserving the legacy of Holocaust survivors
The remaining holocaust survivors are dying. How will we save their stories? Halina Litman Yasharoff Peabody remembers the events of her life during the Holocaust in remarkable detail. She was only six when Russians invaded her Polish town, arrested her father, and sent him to a prison camp in Siberia. The Germans arrived in 1941, setting off a string of horrors for Peabody, her mother, and her baby sister: the hiding, the ghetto, the mass graves, the escape by train, and the bomb that took two of her fingers. "You don't forget those things," she said at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., recently. "And I'm one of the last eyewitnesses." Eyewitness perspectives like Peabody's have served as invaluable educational resources for the Holocaust Museum since the institution opened near the National Mall 25 years ago. But as the number of survivors dwindles, the museum must prepare for a future without them. Peabody is part of a team of more than 80 survivors who fill a wide variety of roles as volunteers, ranging from translating primary source documents for the collections to completing the museum's intensive tour guide training and leading visitors through the exhibits. Peabody has traveled from her home in Bethesda, Maryland, to the museum nearly every week for the past 15 years. Sometimes she works at the information desk in the light-filled lobby. On other days, she tells her story in front of an audience as part of the museum's First Person event series. It's a well-oiled, mutually beneficial system. Like many survivors, Peabody said she feels drawn to the museum, its staff, and the network of other survivors. "They are all my family," she said after saying goodbye to a staff member with a kiss on the cheek. "Because I don't have any, you know? They're mine." The museum staff also relies on the survivors to connect with visitors in a visceral way that an exhibit alone cannot accomplish. Diane Saltzman, the museum's director of constituency engagement, said survivors help create lasting impressions among new audiences, particularly children. Every year, she coordinates around 375 events around the country with survivors who volunteer at the museum, enabling them to travel to other communities outside of D.C. to share their stories. But time is taking its inevitable toll. Saltzman has been invited to 80th, 90th, and even 100th birthday parties for aging survivors. The oldest survivor who is still volunteering is 101 years old. "It's a challenge, from a personal perspective. These are not just people that come to work every day. They are family," Saltzman said, echoing Peabody.

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A Generation Apart
It takes years to heal some wounds.
Others we keep for generations.

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse A Generation Apart for showing how
children's parents are forever affected by their Holocaust experiences.