Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Armies of Heaven for describing the utter depravity of
the Crusaders and how they roasted Muslim children on spits when they got
hungry. After all they had a plenary indulgence from the Pope which forgave
them any sin no matter what it was when committed on a Crusade.

Armies of Heaven
The First Crusade and the Quest For Apocalypse
By Jay Rubenstein

Army of Heaven (2011) - 402 pages
Armies of Heaven at Amazon.com

At Moson, the River Danube ran red with blood. In Dalmatia, the Crusaders gouged out the eyes and cut off the hands and feet of rebellious locals, and put them on public view as a warning to others. At Antioch, the invaders - their saddles freshly decorated with sawed-off heads - indiscriminately clogged the streets with the bodies of Eastern Christians and Turks. At Ma'arra, they skewered children on spits, cooked, and ate them. They slept alongside corpses; they had visions of saints and ghostly warriors marching in their midst. By the time the Crusaders reached Jerusalem, their quest - and their violence - had become distinctly otherworldly: blood literally ran shin-deep through the city's streets once Jerusalem's defenses collapsed and the Crusaders seized their prize.

Beginning in 1095 and culminating four bloody years later in the siege of Jerusalem, the First Crusade represented a new kind of warfare: holy, unrestrained, and apocalyptic. For the Christian warriors, many of them uneducated Germanic tribesmen, the Crusade represented an opportunity to bring about the End Times by seizing the holiest city on earth from its heathen occupiers; it was widely held that, once Christians held Jerusalem, a new phase of God's plan would begin. For the comparatively sophisticated residents of the Muslim territories and cities of the East, the hordes of near-barbarian Christians represented something altogether different: a deluge of religious fanatics and professional combatants whose zeal and savagery threatened to topple every civilization that stood in their way.

In Armies of Heaven, medieval historian Jay Rubenstein tells the story of the First Crusade through the eyes of those who witnessed it. Using original manuscripts, chronicles, and autobiographical works. Rubenstein vividly reconstructs this cataclysmic event-and reveals the fundamental role that apocalyptic thought played in motivating the Crusaders. At once an innovative military and spiritual history, a psychological exploration of medieval warriors and churchmen, and a compelling presentation of how the experience of fighting in an apocalyptic war can transform and remake a culture, Armies of Heaven is a thrilling work of history that will revolutionize our understanding of the Crusades.

Jay Rubenstein is an associate professor of Medieval History at the University of Tennessee, and holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. The author of Guibert of Nogent: Portrait of a Medieval Mind, he has been named both a Rhodes Scholar and a MacArthur Fellow, and was awarded the Koren Prize from the Society for French Historical Studies for the best article in the field of French History published in its year. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee.

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Armies of Heaven
The First Crusade and the Quest For Apocalypse
By Jay Rubenstein

Sioux Falls Atheists endorse Armies of Heaven for describing the utter depravity of
the Crusaders and how they roasted Muslim children on spits when they got
hungry. After all they had a plenary indulgence from the Pope which forgave
them any sin no matter what it was when committed on a Crusade.