Sioux Falls Atheists
Sioux Falls Atheists and Atheism, Agnostics and Humanism

History's Food For Thought
The thinking of men of reason as they
emerged from the middle ages into the light

  1. Psalms CIII, 990 BC The wind passeth over it, and it is gone.
  2. Homer, the Odyssey, 800 BC Do not remain long from home.
  3. Confucius, 515 BC The cautious rarely blunder.
  4. Cicero, 80 BC History is the witness of time, the memory of who we are. It is the ultimate teacher about life, the messenger from the past.
  5. Horace, Epistles, 20 BC Time will reveal whatever is hidden, and it will hide and bury whatever now calls forth splendor.
  6. Tacitus, Annals III, 110 When we observe world affairs, is it not quite plain that fortune cares little for wisdom or foolishness but converts one to the other with capricious delight?
  7. Edward Fitzgerald, The Rubaiyat of Omar AKhayyam, 1100 The bird of time has but little way to flutter - and the bird is on the wing.
  8. Mich de Montaigne, 1550 The strongest, most generous, and proudest of all virtues is true courage.
  9. Michel de Montaigne, Essays, 1588 Truth lacks the privilege at all times and under every circumstance. As noble as it is, it has its limits.
  10. William Shakespeare, 1590 Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore. So do our minutes hasten to their end.
  11. John Lyly, Endymion III, 1591 Time draweth wrinkles in a fair face, But addeth fresh colors to a fast friend, which neither heat, nor cold, nor misery, nor place, nor destiny, can alter or diminish.
  12. Christopher Marlowe and George Chapman, Hero and Leander, 1598 Whoever loved that loved not at first sight?
  13. William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, 1599 It's Greek to me.
  14. Shakespeare, Othello I, 1604 I spoke of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field; Of hair-breath 'scapes i' the imminent deadly breach.
  15. Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, 1605 Antiquities are remnants of history which have casually escaped the shipwreck of time.
  16. William Shakespeare, Pericies, 1607 Time's the king of men, He's both their parent, and he is their grave, and gives them what he will, not what they crave.
  17. John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi, 1613 Eagles commonly fly alone: they are crows, daws, and starlings that flock together.
  18. John Dryden, An Evening's Love II, 1671 Passion makes us cowards grow, What made us brave before.
  19. George Savile (Marquess of Halifax), Political, Moral And Miscellaneous Reflections, 1690 Till follies become ruinous, the world is better with them than if would be without them.
  20. Isaac Newton, Quote, 1725 "I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me."
  21. Benjamin Wincomb, Moral And Religious Aphorisms, 1753 All expectation hath something of a torment.
  22. William Cowper, The Task, 1785 Oh, for a lodge in some vast wilderness. Some blundless contiguity of shade, Where rumor of oppression and deceit, Of unsuccessful war, Might reach me never more.
  23. Samuel T. Coleridge, The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner IV, 1798 Like one, that on a lonesome road, Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round, walks on, And turns no more his head; Because he knows a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
  24. Samuel T. Coleridge, The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner IV, 1798 Alone, alone, all all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea! And never a saint took pity on My soul in agony.
  25. Percy Bysshe, The Revolt Of Islam II, 1818 I wandered through the wrecks of days departed.
  26. Lord Byron, Childe harold, 1818 Parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues With a new color as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, till - 'tis gone, and all is gray.
  27. Thomas Jefferson, 1819 Man is fed with fables through life, and leaves it in belief he knows something of what has been passing, when in truth he has known nothing but what has passed under his own eye.
  28. Washington Irving, The Sketch-Book, 1820 History fades into fable; fact becomes clouded with doubt and controversy; the inscription molders from the tablet; the statue falls from the pedestal. Columns, arches, pyramids, what are they but heaps of sand; and their epitaphs, but characters written in the dust.
  29. Washington Irving, The Sketchbook, 1820 There is in every true woman's heart a spark of heavenly fire, which lies dormant in the broad daylight of prosperity; but which kindles up, and beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity.
  30. William Hazlitt, Characteristics XXII, 1823 There are names written in her immoral scroll at which fame blushes.
  31. Charles Lamb, To The Shade Of Elliston, 1831 Bless me, how little you look. So shall we all look - kings and kaisers - stripped for the last voyage.
  32. Thomas Babington Macaulay, Letter To Hannah M. Macaulay, 1833 There are not ten people in the world whose deaths would spoil my dinner, but there are one or two whose deaths would break my heart.
  33. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, A Psalm of Life, 1839 Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time.
  34. Robert Browning, Pippa Passes, 1841 In the morning of the world, When earth was nigher Heaven than now.
  35. Warren Hastings, Edinburgh Review, 1841 It is good to learn to look without wonder or disgust on the weaknesses which are to be found in the strongest minds.
  36. Edgar Allen Poe, Marginalia, 1844 The enormous multiplication of books in every branch of knowledge is one of the greatest evils of this age; since it presents one of the most serious obstacles to the a acquisition of correct information, by throwing in the reader's way piles of lumber, in which he must painfully grope for the scrapes of useful matter; peradventure interspersed.
  37. Edgar Allen Poe, 1845 Quote the Raven, Nevermore.
  38. Max Steiner, The Ego And His Own, 1845 So long as you believe in some truth you do not believe in yourself. You are a servant. A man of faith.
  39. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sonnets From The Portuguese, 1847 I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints, - I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears, all of my life! - and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death.
  40. Charles Dickens, Mr. Micawber In David Copperfield, 1850 - Something of an extraordinary nature will turn up.
  41. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Poems, 1855 If wishes would carry me over the land, I would ride with free bridle today, I would greet every tree with a grasp of my hand, I would drink of each river, and swim in each bay.
  42. Walt Whitman, Song of the Broad-Axe, 1856 The future is no more uncertain than the present.
  43. Henry Thoreau, Excursions, 1863 He is blessed over all morals who loses no moment of the passing life in remembering the past.
  44. John Greenlead Whittier, Snowbound, 1866 No cloud above, no earth below - A universe of sky and snow.
  45. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Society and Solitude, 1870 Hitch your wagon to a star.
  46. Henry Stanley, Quote, 1871 "Dr. Livingston, I presume."
  47. Friedrich Nietzsche, 1872 Man is not capable of forgetting. He refuses to let go of the past. However far and fast he runs, he drags the chain with him.
  48. F. W. Bourdilllon, The Night has a Thousand Eyes, 1873 The mind has a thousand eyes And the heart but one. Yet the light of a whole life dies When love is done.
  49. John Stuart Mill, Three Essays on Religion, 1874 Human existence is girt round with mystery: the narrow region of our experience is a small island in the midst of a boundless sea. To add to this mystery, the domain of our earthly existence is not only an island in infinite space, but also in infinite time. The past and the future are alike shrouded from us: we neither know the origin of anything which is, nor its final destination.
  50. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Hanging of the Crane, 1875 O fortunate, O happy day. When a new household finds its place Among the myriad homes of earth Like a new star just sprung to birth.
  51. Friedrich Nietzsche, 1888 What does not kill us makes us stronger.
  52. Rudyard Kipling, Recessional, 1897 Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget - lest we forget.
  53. Alfred Lord Tennyson, Crossing the Bar, 1889 Twilight and evening bell, and after that the dark! And may there be sadness of farewell When I embark.
  54. A. E. Housman, The Carpenter's Son, 1896 Make some day a decent end, Shrewder fellows than your friend. Fare you well, for ill fare I: Live, lads, and I will die.
  55. John Lennon, 1970 Life is what happens to us while we're making other plans.
  56. Unknown, 1980, Perception is everything.
  57. Ronald Reagan, 1985 Trust, but verify.

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History's Food For Thought
The thinking of men of reason as they
emerged from the middle ages into the light